Dhea for low t

You described exactly what I was experiencing this past Fall, and I developed POTS in February… it was terrifying to feel this way… and I only got worse overy the winter. I feel for you. Have you joined the Adrenal Fatigue Recovery group on Facebook? I’ve learned a lot on there. I found I was waking up at 4am due to low blood sugar, which caused my body to go into a stress state, which spiked my cortisol and caused me to wake up. I’d cook eggs and bacon and go back to bed. I found that eating a high protein snack just before bed would help, and eating a big high protein breakfast first thing in the AM kept my blood sugar more stable throughout the day. My blood sugar is under control now. Best of luck!
I drink sole water with fresh OJ every

Side effects will differ between men and women, and are usually dose dependent. Women tend to convert excess DHEA into testosterone, which can lead to acne and facial hair growth. Men tend to convert the excess DHEA into estrogen, which can cause decreased libido or fatigue. Those experiencing the presence of these side effects, or a lack of effect, should have their blood levels monitored to reevaluate dosage. DHEA also comes as 7-keto DHEA. This alternative can be appealing to males as it doesn’t have the downstream conversion to estrogen.

The labels claim DHEA will help us lose weight , rev up our libido, lift depression and give us back the strength, immunity, and stamina we had when we were 20 — the age at which our bodies naturally produced the most DHEA. While on the surface this is appealing (who wouldn’t want to feel 20 again?), it’s obviously not what nature intended. We also don’t know enough about DHEA to be conducting such a large, unregulated public experiment. DHEA is a potent steroid — that’s why it made headlines and why it should be approached with due diligence.

Except for emergency contraception (“morning after pills”), you can’t buy steroid sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone over the counter—they are sold as prescription drugs, largely because of their potential dangers . For instance, long-term use of menopausal estrogen/progestin therapy can increase the risk of breast cancer, strokes, and blood clots, while testosterone therapy has been linked to elevated risk of heart disease and possibly prostate cancer. Oddly enough, one steroid hormone is sold as a dietary supplement—DHEA, or dehydroepiandrosterone. Touted as the “superhormone” or even “nature’s antidote to aging,” DHEA is widely promoted in anti-aging programs and clinics. We last reported on it a decade ago, when it was exempted from classification as a controlled substance by Congress, thanks to powerful industry lobbying (DHEA’s chief protector was Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, where supplement makers are heavily concentrated). In Canada and many other countries, DHEA is available only by prescription. It’s time for us to take another look at this problematic supplement. Hoping for the fountain of youth DHEA is the most abundant steroid hormone in the body and is produced mainly by the adrenal glands, which sit atop the kidneys. The supplements are made in labs from chemicals found in wild yams and soybeans. DHEA is sometimes called a “parent” or “master” hormone because it is converted into other hormones, notably testosterone and estrogen. Many of its purported benefits (and possible risks) are due to its potential conversion to these hormones. However, swallowing DHEA doesn’t have the same effects in everyone. The biochemistry is complex, and the results are highly variable and largely unpredictable (a scary word when you’re dealing with hormones). DHEA appears to also have biological effects independent of its conversion into other hormones. After age 25, DHEA production begins to decline, and by age 70 it typically has fallen by about 80 percent. People with certain major chronic diseases tend to have more rapid declines in DHEA. Many hormones and other compounds in the body also decline with age and are similarly promoted as anti-aging supplements. But while DHEA is associated with youth and vigor, it does not follow that supplements will reverse or even slow age-related processes. Risky DHEA: Gambling with Hormones Risky DHEA: Gambling with Hormones The list of known or potential risks from DHEA is even longer than the proposed benefits. Some studies have found no serious adverse effects, but they have been small and lasted only several months.

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Dhea for low t

dhea for low t

Except for emergency contraception (“morning after pills”), you can’t buy steroid sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone over the counter—they are sold as prescription drugs, largely because of their potential dangers . For instance, long-term use of menopausal estrogen/progestin therapy can increase the risk of breast cancer, strokes, and blood clots, while testosterone therapy has been linked to elevated risk of heart disease and possibly prostate cancer. Oddly enough, one steroid hormone is sold as a dietary supplement—DHEA, or dehydroepiandrosterone. Touted as the “superhormone” or even “nature’s antidote to aging,” DHEA is widely promoted in anti-aging programs and clinics. We last reported on it a decade ago, when it was exempted from classification as a controlled substance by Congress, thanks to powerful industry lobbying (DHEA’s chief protector was Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, where supplement makers are heavily concentrated). In Canada and many other countries, DHEA is available only by prescription. It’s time for us to take another look at this problematic supplement. Hoping for the fountain of youth DHEA is the most abundant steroid hormone in the body and is produced mainly by the adrenal glands, which sit atop the kidneys. The supplements are made in labs from chemicals found in wild yams and soybeans. DHEA is sometimes called a “parent” or “master” hormone because it is converted into other hormones, notably testosterone and estrogen. Many of its purported benefits (and possible risks) are due to its potential conversion to these hormones. However, swallowing DHEA doesn’t have the same effects in everyone. The biochemistry is complex, and the results are highly variable and largely unpredictable (a scary word when you’re dealing with hormones). DHEA appears to also have biological effects independent of its conversion into other hormones. After age 25, DHEA production begins to decline, and by age 70 it typically has fallen by about 80 percent. People with certain major chronic diseases tend to have more rapid declines in DHEA. Many hormones and other compounds in the body also decline with age and are similarly promoted as anti-aging supplements. But while DHEA is associated with youth and vigor, it does not follow that supplements will reverse or even slow age-related processes. Risky DHEA: Gambling with Hormones Risky DHEA: Gambling with Hormones The list of known or potential risks from DHEA is even longer than the proposed benefits. Some studies have found no serious adverse effects, but they have been small and lasted only several months.

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